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August 2014 Archives

What are the general rules for Minnesota prenuptial agreements?

Traditional thinking once held that when a couple finally decided to tie the knot and get married, the last thing they should consider was divorce. Times have changed, and with the change in time, so has the average structure of most families. Today, it is not uncommon for individuals to remarry two or three times throughout the course of their lives.

Retirement plans and pensions during complex asset divorce

If you have been contemplating divorce, then you have a lot to think about. If there are children involved, then decisions regarding child custody and child support payments need to be addressed. There may also be a conflict over which spouse will receive certain properties. That is why retirement plans and pensions are sometimes overlooked during this confusion.

Parental gatekeeping and child custody in Minnesota

The idea behind parental gatekeeping in Minnesota is basically that one parent may decide to make it harder for the other parent to see a child after a divorce. Gatekeeping is the act of restricting the open access that these two parties have to one another.

Basic understanding of Minnesota child custody law

When a married couple with children decides to dissolve their marriage, determining what is in the best interests of the children is understandably some of the most difficult aspects of the divorce. Often, couples are unable to reach mutual agreements and matters of child custody must be decided by a Family Court judge.

Minnesota law helps to preserve grandparent’s rights

Divorce usually goes hand-in-hand with heated emotions. It is not uncommon for both sides engaged in a divorce to participate in petty acts against the adverse party merely out of spite. Perhaps one of the most unfortunate consequences of these disputes is the alienation of children involved in the divorce from their grandparents.

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